Yosemite Camping: Most Beautiful & Best Campgrounds in Yosemite National Park

yosemite camping

A detailed guide to camping in Yosemite, including all the best campgrounds inside and outside the park.

Yosemite National Park is a bucket list place for visitors from all over the world–the towering granite cliffs, the thundering waterfalls, the bears! But gosh darn-it if it isn’t hard to find available campsites in Yosemite. 

Yosemite has been an icon for a long time and that status won’t change anytime soon. And now, more than ever, advanced planning is needed to score a campsite in Yosemite.

Never fear! I’ve been successfully navigating the Yosemite camping scene for many years now and this guide will help you navigate it like a pro too. 

Below, I’ve created a list of the best Yosemite campgrounds, including the most up-to-date info on how to snag a spot both inside and outside the park.

Note: this post contains affiliate links, which help run this site at no extra cost to you so I can keep providing free travel advice and tips.

best camping in yosemite national park

A Quick Glance at Yosemite National Park Campgrounds

Campground Location Sites Toilets Group RV
North Pines Yosemite Valley 80 Flush No Yes
Upper Pines Yosemite Valley 235 Flush No Yes, dump station
Lower Pines Yosemite Valley 73 Flush No Yes
Camp 4 Yosemite Valley 61 Flush No No
Wawona Wawona 97 Flush Yes Yes, dump station
Bridalveil Creek* Glacier Point Road 115 Flush Yes No
Hodgdon Meadow Hodgdon Meadow 103 Flush No No
Crane Flat* Crane Flat 162 Flush No No
Yosemite Creek Tioga Road 75 Vault No No
Tamarack Flat Tioga Road 52 Flush No No
White Wolf Tioga Road 74 Flush No No
Porcupine Flat* Tioga Road 52 Vault No No
Tuolumne Meadows* Tioga Road 304 Flush No No
* = closed in 2022

America the Beautiful Pass

If you’re planning to visit more than 2-3 big national parks in a year, you should consider getting the America the Beautiful Pass

This pass is sold at REI, costs $80, and will get you into all of the National Park Service sites.

You can also buy the America the Beautiful Pass at any park entrance station that collects fees or online here. The National Park Service sells discounted passes for seniors and veterans.


Get your FREE California Travel Planner – including printable checklists and my favorite two-week itinerary for the state.


Making Reservations for Yosemite National Park

Camping Reservations

Making reservations for Yosemite national park

Getting Yosemite camping permits is almost a competitive sport these days, but you can bring your A-game with these Yosemite camping tips.

Most campgrounds in Yosemite need a reservation, especially for the summer season, and all reservations are available online on recreation.gov. 

You cannot get same-day campground reservations in the park, even if you beg. Believe me, I’ve tried. You must book the campsite on recreation.gov, regardless of where you are. 

Here are the steps to do that:

  1. Make a profile on recreation.gov
  2. Search “Yosemite National Park” or the campground you’re interested in staying in.
  3. Put in your vacation dates and see if there are any available!
  4. Darn it! Are there no sites available for your date? Check back on recreation.gov regularly. If a cancellation is made, the rangers will release the campsite back to recreation.gov, and this can happen any time of day. 

Campsites become available six months in advance at 7 am Pacific Standard Time. I *highly* recommend logging in before 7 am, six months in advance to snag a spot.

Park Reservations

In 2022, Yosemite National Park has a “peak hours reservation” system, which means that you need to have a reservation to enter the park between 6 am-4 pm. However, if you have a camping permit, you don’t need an additional reservation to enter the park. 

The reservation permit system lasts from May 20th to September 30th, 2022, and you can get your permit on recreation.gov. 

70% of the reservations were available online on March 23, and the remaining 30% are available 7 days in advance at 8 am Pacific Standard Time. Read more about the entry permit system at Yosemite.

Places to Camp in Yosemite National Park

Yosemite National Park has tons of campgrounds and they average about $36/night for a single site. These are the most popular places to camp around the park.

Best Places to camp in Yosemite national park

Yosemite Valley

Yosemite Valley is the destination of choice for most tourists. This is the iconic valley where El Capitan, Half Dome, Bridalveil Falls, and Yosemite Falls are viewable. Yosemite Valley is deep in the heart of the park. 

In Yosemite Valley, you’ll find Upper Pines Campground, Lower Pines Campground, North Pines Campground, and Camp 4 Campground.

Wawona/Glacier Point Road

Wawona is the district you enter when you come in from the South Entrance/Fish Camp (Hwy 41), about an hour’s drive from Yosemite Valley. 

This district is home to the famous Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias. It also includes the historic Wawona Hotel, plus a larger historic district and the Wawona Campground.

Hodgdon Meadow/Crane Flat

Hodgdon Meadow and Crane Flat are located just past the Big Oak Flat Entrance/Groveland (Hwy 120). 

This area is one of the least visited areas of the park and is the closest district to Hetch Hetchy. This is where you’ll find Hodgdon Meadows Campground and Crane Flat Campground.

Tioga Road

Tioga Road is a high elevation road that leads to Tuolumne Meadows and the east side of the park. 

There are five campgrounds here: Tamarack Flat Campground, Yosemite Creek Campground, Porcupine Creek Campground (Closed until 2023), White Wolf Campground, and Tuolumne Meadows Campground (closed in 2022 and 2023).

Best Campgrounds in Yosemite National Park

These are my favorite Yosemite camping spots from top to bottom. Read more about Yosemite’s campgrounds here.

Best campgrounds in Yosemite National Park

Yosemite Valley

Below are a group of campgrounds that are collectively called “The Pines.” They’re probably the three most popular campgrounds in the whole park. 

They include Upper Pines, Lower Pines, and North Pines. All three are across the street or the river from one another and each provides excellent access to Yosemite Valley. 

Note that reservations are required at all the Pines campgrounds.

North Pines Campground

Why it’s worth camping at: It provides a cozier atmosphere than the other Pines Campgrounds.
Location: Yosemite Valley
Open: Early April-late October
Number of sites: 80 (13 RV only, 5 accessible sites)
Cost: $36
Reservations allowed: Yes, click here to reserve.
Amenities: Flush toilets, a fire pit, picnic table, and drinking water, but no RV hookups or showers.
Campground map

North Pines Campground is across the Merced River from Lower Pines Campground. 

This is a smaller campground than the other two Pines. Even though it’s very popular, it has a smaller, greener, and cozier feel than the other two. 

Like the other Pines, this campground is within walking distance of the Mist Trailhead as well as Curry Village and a shuttle stop.

Upper Pines Campground

Why it’s worth camping at: It’s the biggest campground in the Valley and one of the few open year-round.
Location: Yosemite Valley
Open: Year-round
Number of sites: 235 (32 RV-only sites, 5 tent-only sites, 5 accessible sites)
Cost: $36
Reservations allowed: Yes, click here to reserve.
Amenities: Flush toilets, a fire pit, drinking water, and a picnic table. No showers and no RV hookups, but has an RV dump station.
Campground map 

Upper Pines Campground is situated next to the Merced River and within walking distance of the Mist Trailhead as well as the cafe and shop at Curry Village. 

The campground offers little in the way of privacy from other sites and can be noisy if you have a site near the road. With that said, it’s near a shuttle bus stop, which can be convenient for getting around the park.

Lower Pines Campground

Why it’s worth camping at: Slightly quieter and smaller than Upper Pines Campground, but with all the same access to the Valley.
Location: Yosemite Valley
Open: Mid-April to late October
Number of sites: 73 (9 RV only, 5 accessible sites)
Cost: $36
Reservations allowed: Yes, click here to reserve.
Amenities:  Flush toilets, a fire pit, picnic table, drinking water, and an amphitheater but no dump station or showers.
Campground map

Lower Pines Campground is right across the street from both North Pines and Upper Pines. This is a slightly smaller campground but still just as popular as Upper Pines. 

Lower Pines and Upper Pines campgrounds are both adjacent to a busy park road, which may add to the noise level, but on the plus side, they’re both close to a shuttle stop.

Camp 4

Camp 4 campground in Yosemite

Why it’s worth camping at: It’s your best chance for a last-minute campsite in Yosemite Valley.
Location: Yosemite Valley
Open: Year-round
Number of sites: 61 (all walk-in and tent-only)
Cost: $10
Reservations allowed: Available by a daily lottery only. Click here to enter the Yosemite camping lottery.
Amenities: Flush toilets, a fire pit, picnic table, and drinking water. No RV accommodations or showers.
Campground map

Camp 4 Campground is located across from the Yosemite Valley Lodge and a lot of it is directly adjacent to Northside Drive (aka it might be noisy). 

That said, Camp 4 operates on a daily lottery system, so it might be your only chance for an overnight reservation in the park if you couldn’t snag one before. You can enter the lottery through recreation.gov the day before.

Camp 4 Campground is an exclusively group campground with six spaces in each spot, so you may end up sharing your space with some strangers (or “new friends” depending on your outlook on life).

Wawona/Glacier Point Road

Wawona Campground

Why it’s worth camping at: It’s the closest campground to the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias.
Location: Wawona
Open: Year-round
Number of sites: 97 (4 RV only, 47 tent only, 1 group site, 2 accessible sites)
Cost: $36 or $26 in the off-season.
Reservations allowed: Reservations are required from mid-April to mid-October but first-come, first-served sites are available in the off-season. Click here to reserve.
Amenities: Flush toilets, drinking water, a fire pit, and picnic table. No RV hookups or showers but there’s a dump station.
Campground map

Wawona Campground is the closest campground to the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias. I stayed here the first time I ever visited Yosemite! 

The campground is located next to a river and near the historic district of Wawona. Reservations are required in the summer, but in winter it’s first-come, first-served. 

Wawona Campground is about 45 minutes from Yosemite Valley.

Bridalveil Creek Campground (Closed in 2022)

Why it’s worth camping at: It’s the closest campground to Glacier Point, plus it has group and stock sites.
Location: Glacier Point Road
Open: Mid-July to early September
Number of sites: 115 (2 group sites, 3 horse sites, 0 accessible sites)
Cost: $36
Reservations allowed: No, first-come, first-served.
Amenities:  Flush toilets, a fire pit, picnic table, and drinking water. No showers or RV hookups.
Campground map

Bridalveil Creek Campground is a lovely spot on Glacier Point Road, set back from the road so that you can fall asleep to the sounds of frogs in the nearby meadow. 

This campground is closed in 2022, but normally operates for a short window in the summer on a first-come, first-served basis.

Hodgdon Meadow/Crane Flat

Hodgdon Meadow Campground

Why it’s worth camping at: It puts you close to Hetch Hetchy!
Location: Hodgdon Meadow/Crane Flat
Open: Year-round
Number of sites: 103 (0 accessible sites)
Cost: $36
Reservations allowed: Yes, from April to October. The rest of the year is first-come, first-served. Click here to reserve.
Amenities: Flush toilets, a fire pit, picnic table, and drinking water. No showers, RV hookups, or dump station.
Campground map

The Hodgdon Meadow Campground is located just past the Big Oak Flat Entrance kiosks along Highway 140. 

This campground has reservations required for the summer season (April-October) but is first-come, first-served after that. 

Hodgdon Meadow Campground has the fastest access to the Hetch Hetchy area. It’s a good place to stay overnight if you’ve driven a long distance and don’t have the energy to get to Tioga Road. 

While there aren’t any electrical hookups or a dump station, this campground does accommodate RVs and has several group campsites.

Crane Flat Campground (Closed until 2023)

Why it’s worth camping at: Close access to Merced Grove and Tuolumne Grove of Giant Sequoias.
Location: Hodgdon Meadow/Crane Flat
Open: Closed in 2023
Number of sites: 162 (1 RV only, 88 tent only, 2 accessible sites)
Cost: $36
Reservations allowed: Yes
Amenities:  Flush toilets, a fire pit, picnic table, and drinking water. No RV hookups or showers.
Campground map

Crane Flat Campground is about 15 minutes down Highway 140 past the Big Oak Flat Entrance. 

This campground is closed until 2023 but is a great launching spot to explore two of Yosemite’s smaller giant sequoia groves: Merced Grove and Tuolumne Grove. 

These groves are less busy and have fewer trees than the Mariposa Grove, but I like them more for this reason. 

Crane Flat Campground is also near the Crane Flat gas station, which offers convenience store snacks and ice cream.

Tioga Road

Yosemite Creek Campground

Why it’s worth camping at: It’s a great launching pad for Yosemite Falls, plus it’s a gorgeous spot.
Location: Tioga Road
Open: June-September
Number of sites: 75 (2 accessible sites)
Cost: $24
Reservations allowed: Yes, but not available for 2022 yet (they’ll be available starting July 11th). Check recreation.gov here.
Amenities: Vault toilets, a fire pit, creek water (must boil), and picnic table. No RV hookups or showers.
Campground map

The Yosemite Creek Campground is another one of my favorite campgrounds in the park. To access this campground, you’ll need to drive down a winding road five miles off Tioga Road, but it’s worth it. 

Simply put, this campground is just beautiful. It’s tucked away among the High Sierra white granite, it’s quiet, and it’s a cool spot to hike to Yosemite Falls from.

Tamarack Flat Campground

Why it’s worth camping at: Close access to the Wildcat Falls Trail in a cozy, primitive campground.
Location: Tioga Road
Open: June-October
Number of sites: 52 (no RV sites, 5 accessible sites)
Cost: $24
Reservations allowed: Yes, click here to reserve.
Amenities: Flush toilets, a fire pit, creek water (must boil), and a picnic table. No showers or RV sites.
Campground map

Tamarack Flat Campground is located three miles from Tioga Road on a fairly rough road, which is why it can’t accommodate RVs. 

This campground is considered a primitive campground because you have to boil the creek water if you want to drink it, but they do have flush toilets. Tamarack Flat Campground is also a good launching spot if you want to hike.

Of the five campgrounds along Tioga Road, Tamarack Flat Campground is the easternmost one, closest to Crane Flat and Yosemite Valley (45-min drive).

White Wolf Campground

Why it’s worth camping at: You get access to the White Wolf Lodge (when it’s open).
Location: Tioga Road
Open: July-September
Number of sites: 74 (0 accessible sites)
Cost: $30
Reservations allowed: Yes, however, reservations have not opened yet for 2022. Check recreation.gov.
Amenities:  Flush toilets, a fire pit, picnic table, and drinking water. No RV hookups or showers.
Campground map

White Wolf Campground is the second closest campground on Tioga Road to Yosemite Valley and it can accommodate RVs. 

This campground is located in the High Sierra region of the park and is right next to White Wolf Lodge, which is open seasonally. The lodge is quite primitive here but offers a small cafe and tent cabins for rent. 

White Wolf Campground is supposedly opening in 2022, but you can’t make reservations on recreation.gov yet, so keep your eyes peeled if you want to stay here!

Porcupine Flat Campground (Closed until 2023)

Why it’s worth camping at: Close access to the Porcupine Creek Trailhead and Tuolumne Meadows.
Location: Tioga Road
Open: Closed until 2023
Number of sites: 52 (4 accessible sites, no RV access)
Cost: $20
Reservations allowed: No, first-come, first-served.
Amenities: Vault toilets, a fire pit, picnic table, and creek water (must boil). No RV hookups or showers.
Campground map

The Porcupine Flat Campground is another high-elevation campground situated off Tioga Road. 

This campground is about a 30-minute drive from Tuolumne Meadows and over an hour from Yosemite Valley. This campground is not RV accessible and you have to boil creek water to obtain water here. 

Porcupine Flat Campground is close to the Porcupine Creek Trailhead, which is how you hike to North Dome.

Tuolumne Meadows Campground (Closed until 2024-2025)

Tuolumne Meadows Campground

Why it’s worth camping at: You can enjoy the cool temperatures of the High Sierra, plus the amenities like the Tuolumne Store and Grill.
Location: Tioga Road
Open: Closed until 2024-2025
Number of sites: 304 (7 accessible sites)
Cost: $36
Reservations allowed: Yes, when it’s open.
Amenities: Flush toilets, a fire pit, picnic table, and drinking water. No RV hookups or showers.
Campground map

Tuolumne Meadows Campground is perhaps the biggest single campground in the park but it’s sadly closed until at least 2024. 

This campground is smack dab in Tuolumne Meadows and adjacent to the Tuolumne Grill and Store, which is a popular stop-off location for Pacific Crest Trail hikers.

Best Backcountry Campgrounds in Yosemite National Park

Best Backcountry Campgrounds in Yosemite National Park

Yosemite National Park has two ways to camp in the backcountry: you can backpack the traditional way or you can stay in a backcountry High Sierra camp.

In 2022, the High Sierra camps are still closed but they’ll open up for reservations with a lottery system in October 2022. Read more about the high sierra camps reservations.

High Sierra Camps in Yosemite

The High Sierra Camps are kind of like European-style hiking chalets. Meals are prepared for you and you can even go on guided hikes based out of the camps. There are five High Sierra Camps:

  • Glen Aulin
  • May Lake
  • Sunrise
  • Merced Lake
  • Vogelsang

The best way to plan a trip to or from these camps is to read the High Sierra Loop Hiking Information page and the Yosemite Hospitality page.

Traditional Backpacking in Yosemite

If you’d rather hoof your gear around, you can get a traditional backpacking permit. This is how to do that:

  1. Create a profile on recreation.gov.
  2. Search “Yosemite Wilderness Permits.”
  3. Input your dates and look for the trailhead you want to leave from.
  4. Pick up your permit the day before your trip at one of the Yosemite Wildnerness Permit Stations. You can rent a bear canister at one of the offices too. 

Most backcountry permits are released six months in advance and a small percentage are held back and released a week in advance at 7 am Pacific Time.  

Yosemite doesn’t have specific backcountry campgrounds (aside from the High Sierra camps). 

Rather, you pick a trailhead, and then you’ll engage in a dispersed style of camping, where you pick your own campsite in the backcountry.

Free Camping in Yosemite National Park

Free Camping in Yosemite National Park

There’s no free camping in Yosemite nor is there any dispersed camping in Yosemite. 

However, there are several National Forests around the park. This means there’s free camping near Yosemite, including both dispersed camping and campground camping.

All of the National Forests below have both types of camping. My favorite new way to find free campsites is with the FreeRoam App, which shows both dispersed camping areas and campgrounds.

Free Camping Near Yosemite National Park

Looking for more accommodation options besides just camping? Read our complete guide on where to stay in Yosemite.

Campgrounds Near Yosemite: Best Camping Outside the Park

There are tons of open campgrounds just outside the park if you strike out with in-park camping. Many of these campgrounds have a longer camping limit too, meaning you can stay longer in one spot.  

Keep in mind that almost all of these campgrounds are in bear territory. Always follow posted signage about food storage regulations.

Big Oak Flat Entrance 

Stanislaus National Forest is just outside the Big Oak Flat Entrance (Hwy 140) and has lots of free camping to explore. All of the campgrounds I’m recommending can be booked on recreation.gov.

Lumsden Campground: 25 miles from the park and located on the Tuolumne Wild and Scenic River. RVs should not try to access this campground; it’s best for tents or pop-up truck campers.

South Fork Campground: 26 miles from the park entrance, just down the road from Lumsden Campground, also not suitable for RVs.

Tioga Pass Entrance

Inyo National Forest and Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest are just outside the Tioga Pass Entrance (Hwy 120) on the east side of the park. 

Hartley Springs Campground: This campground is located near the town of June Lake (also a cute place to visit) and is 26 miles from the Tioga Pass Entrance. This is a popular summer campground.

Glass Creek Campground: This is a free campground 34 miles from the Tioga Pass Entrance. It’s in a forest north of Mammoth Lakes, CA, and can accommodate RVs. This is a popular place to stay overnight.

South Entrance

Sierra National Forest is located outside the South Entrance (Hwy 41) and offers some camping. 

This is the most congested corridor into the park because it’s the closest entrance to the Central Valley and LA. 

Summerdale Campground: This campground is just 1.4 miles from the South Entrance and is extremely popular.

Big Sandy Campground: This small campground has just 18 sites and is first-come, first-served.

Arch Rock Entrance 

Sierra National Forest is also outside the Arch Rock Entrance and has a few small campgrounds along the Merced River. 

Dry Gulch Campground: This is a small campground just outside the park boundary, almost within the town of El Portal. These sites are right along the river, which is great for cooling off.

Dirt Flat Campground: Despite the name, the Dirt Flat Campground is quite nice. It’s just down the road from the Dry Gulch Campground and is also situated along the Merced River. There are no RV sites here, all five sites are walk-in sites.

Yosemite Camping Tips

Yosemite Camping Tips

Plan for Traffic

Yosemite National Park, especially Yosemite Valley, can be extremely congested with traffic in the summer. 

Wait times to get through the entrance stations can exceed two hours between 8 am-11 am. The best way to avoid traffic is to go early or late in the day or to visit in the off-season.

Download the NPS App

The National Park Service has launched an NPS App to help you find resources during your stay. Best of all: it can be used offline! 

I checked out the Yosemite resources in the app and the camping information is super helpful and detailed. 

With that siad, other pages on the app, like the hiking page, were not updated at all (it only had two hikes on it), but hey, it’s still better than nothing.

Research your Campground

I’ve tried to be as detailed as I can in this article for each campground, but you should still plan on researching your campground before you go. 

Campgrounds vary in their services year-to-year and it’s better not to be surprised. You can Google each campground for more information or use the NPS App.

Stay Near Your Destination

Yosemite National Park is huge and many of the roads are windy and steep getting in and out of the park. 

This combo means you can easily eat up half your day traveling to your destination. To save time, stay as close as possible to what you want to see in the park.

Keep Wildlife Wild

One of the most treasured moments some of us have in a national park is wildlife moments. 

Yosemite is famously home to rascally black bears that can and do get into careless campers’ food every year. 

Sadly, these bears often have to be killed because of their persistent food-seeking habits. Read up on the food storage rules and follow them diligently. 

Additionally, Yosemite asks visitors to stay half a football field’s length from black bears and 25 yards from all other wildlife.

Best Time to Camp in Yosemite National Park

Best Time to Camp in Yosemite National Park

My favorite time to camp in Yosemite is in the summer. This is when most of the campgrounds are open, the meadows are green, and the wildlife is out. 

Camping in Yosemite in winter is possible but there will be fewer options available.

FAQs About Yosemite Camping

FAQs About Camping in Yosemite

Is Yosemite good for camping?

Yes! Yosemite has lots of great camping in both the front country and backcountry.

What is the best campsite in Yosemite?

The best campsite in Yosemite is North Pines Campground.

How much does it cost to reserve a campsite in Yosemite?

An overnight reservation for a single campsite is typically $20-$36 in Yosemite.

How hard is it to get a campsite for Yosemite? How far in advance should I book?

Yosemite camping reservations are very hard to get. You should plan to book six months in advance. 

Be prompt and ready to book exactly six months in advance because many campgrounds sell out within minutes of when they open at 7 am Pacific Time.

Can you camp in Yosemite without a reservation?

Yes, there are a handful of campgrounds in Yosemite that are first-come, first-served. Read my summaries of the campgrounds above for more info.

Can I sleep in my car in Yosemite?

You can sleep in your car in Yosemite at an established campsite. You cannot sleep in your car in parking lots or pullouts.

How much is it to rent a cabin in Yosemite?

Yosemite camping cabins can be rented here and typically go for about $160/night.

Can you drive an RV in Yosemite?

Yes, you can drive an RV in Yosemite. RV camping in Yosemite is popular but keep in mind that many park roads are windy and steep.

Do cell phones work in Yosemite?

Sometimes! During the summer the sheer number of people in the Valley will prevent you from using data and many areas outside the Valley don’t have cell service.

Are there bears in Yosemite? Do I need bear spray?

Yes, Yosemite is home to the American black bear. You cannot use bear spray in Yosemite. Instead, you should read up on what to do if you see a bear.

Can you have a fire in Yosemite?

You can have a fire in Yosemite in established campsite fire rings as long as there are no fire restrictions in place. Check the campground regulations as well for further information about campfires.

How many days do you need in Yosemite National Park?

Give yourself at least three days to explore Yosemite National Park, although you can do two days in Yosemite if you’re really pressed for time.

What to Pack for Camping in Yosemite

What to Pack for Camping in Yosemite

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

author bio - Meredith Dennis

Meredith Dennis

Meredith is a biologist and writer based in California’s Sierra Nevada. She has lived in 6 states as a biologist, so her intel on hiking and camping is *chef’s kiss* next level. One of her earliest camping memories was being too scared to find a bathroom at night on a family camping trip. Thankfully, she’s come a long way since then and she can help you get there too!


Looking for more Yosemite travel inspiration? Read our related articles below!

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